You can now explore outer space using Google Maps

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Google Maps is no longer just for helping you get around a new town or city on Earth.

A new feature means you can explore outer space including the planets, moons and even the International Space Station.

The new feature, called Planets, use images captured by the Cassini spacecraft, which burned up in Saturn’s atmosphere after spending nearly two decades in space.

During its twenty year mission exploring the solar system, Cassini sent back massive amount of data and images and it from some of these images that the new Google Maps feature is made possible.

“Cassini recorded and sent nearly half a million pictures back to Earth, allowing scientists to reconstruct these distant worlds in unprecedented detail,” Google in a blog post, which announced the new feature.

“Now you can visit these places—along with many other planets and moons—in Google Maps right from your computer.”

Image: Google

Just like when using regular Maps you can zoom in on a location to get a close up look of the Moon’s craters or of Mars, where you can find out how the different regions of the Red Planet got their names.

“Explore the icy plains of Enceladus, where Cassini discovered water beneath the moon’s crust – suggesting signs of life. Peer beneath the thick clouds of Titan to see methane lakes. Inspect the massive crater of Mimas – while it might seem like a sci-fi look-a-like, it is a moon, not a space station,” Google said.

“The fun doesn’t stop there—we’ve added Pluto, Venus, and several other moons for a total of 12 new worlds for you to explore. Grab your spacesuit and check out the rest of this corner of the galaxy that we call home.”

You can take a look at Planets on Google Maps here.

Jonathan Fairfield
Jonathan is our Google Nexus and Android enthusiast. He is also fanatical about football which makes it all the more strange that he should support Stockport County. In addition to writing about tech, Jonathan has a passion for fitness and nutrition and has previously written for one the UK's leading watch and horology websites.
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