Internet trolls are psychopaths, says expert

3

No one likes to suffer from internet trolls and sadly these keyboard warriors seem to be a group that is increasing in numbers.

At a recent summit about online harassment held in Austin Texas there was added security, and with good reason.

The online hate mob Gamergate who speak about violence to women and minorities actually forced a recent discussion session to be shut down amid threats of on-site violence so this in itself shows the seriousness of the situation.

Unfortunately, a recent study suggested that around 40% of internet users have experienced some form of online harassment with the majority of cases affecting people between the ages of 18-29.

Facebook is the number one place where the harassment takes place – largely due to the numbers of people who use this social media outlet.

Quite shockingly, 12.9% of people in the study said that they had been threatened with physical violence. Trolls have come more to the fore in recent years and are drawing more public concern.

Internet troll

A large reason for this is the fact that there are simply more access points and more and more of our daily lives actually take place online. It is not just simply a case of ignoring these trolls and they will go away.

Speaking at the recent SXSW tech festival held in Austin, Texas, trolling expert professor Joseph Reagle said that “measures of sadism, psychopathy, and Machiavellianism positively correlate with trolling”.

He added that that if you enjoy writing comments online, you are more likely to become a troll and that there is a “strong relationship between online commenting frequency and trolling enjoyment.”

A 2014 study into trolling by the researchers from the Universities of Manitoba, Winnipeg and British Columbia also found that online trolls display traits including sadism, narcissism and psychopathy.

The Science of Internet Trolls

 

Share.

3 Comments

  1. Why do social media users feel compelled to read the s**t! Learn some self-discipline and turn the internet off and engage with your fellow humans personally and not always “on-line”. And don’t air your dirty laundry in public! The trolls thrive on the reactions given. Learn to use the internet/social media, don’t let it use you.

  2. > He added that that if you enjoy writing comments online, you are more
    likely to become a troll and that there is a “strong relationship
    between online commenting frequency and trolling enjoyment.”

    No shit, Sherlock. I have yet to see an internet troll who doesn’t post on the internets.

  3. What about the proliferation of ignorant commentators? Would they be sociopathic as well?