Man ruptures thumb tendon playing Candy Crush Saga

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All those hours spent playing Candy Crush Saga could actually be doing you some serious harm – here’s the proof:

A 29 year old California man ruptured a tendon in his thumb from playing the popular game Candy Crush Saga.

The incident, which is believed to be the first of its kind related to excessive smartphone gaming, was the result of the man playing the game using only his left hand for a period of eight weeks.

According to a report in JAMA Internal Medicine, the same repetitive motions involved in touching the screen of his smartphone in order to play the game, resulted in the man rupturing the thickest part of the tendon in his thumb, which in itself is unusual as injuries of this nature normally occur at the bone or in the thinnest part of the tendon.

The report goes onto say that a tendon rupture of this kind is normally very painful. However, due to the man’s need to play the game, his addiction to Candy Crush Saga stopped him from feeling any pain.

The authors of the report also warn of the dangers of becoming addicted to videogames and say that chemicals released in the brain when playing such games can act as a painkiller.

“The potential for video games to reduce pain perception raises clinical and social considerations about excessive use, abuse, and addiction,” read the report. “Future research should consider whether pain reduction is a reason some individuals play video games excessively, manifest addiction, or sustain injuries associated with video gaming.”

With the popularity of the likes of Candy Crush Saga and other games where players are required to repeat the same repetitive tapping movements, it is perhaps unlikely that this kind of repetitive strain injury will be a one-off case.

In 2014, gamers spent more than $1 billion on Candy Crush Saga via in-app purchases.

Are you addicted to Candy Crush Saga or any other computer games?

Have you ever been injured while gaming?

Let us know in the comments section below.

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